Defending Our Beliefs

A friend shared a charming video of young children arguing about the weather, whether it’s sprinkling or raining. Although the content of the argument seems rather inconsequential, the dynamic of the argument is so very common: defending our beliefs.

Join us as we explore how we can all get caught in this and how it can affect our food choices.

Like the children, when we defend our beliefs, we lose sight of how we each live in a different experience, a different reality of what is actually occurring. Like for the children, it was the same amount of precipitation falling from the sky, but each had a different interpretation of it and what it meant to them personally.

That can turn into mental agitation. And to release the tension we often reach for food.

As we all know, it’s a short term fix that may feel good in the moment, but over time becomes a habit and adds weight or other conditions unnecessarily to our lives.

What would happen, do you think, if when you noticed you were being defensive you took a time out? What happens when our mind settles down out of the turbulence of needing someone to see things our way in order for us to feel okay?

Like a snow globe, when we set it down, the snow settles by its own nature and we can again see what’s at the center of the globe, that cute little deer or whatever.

When we step back and let go of our firm grip on our position, our mind naturally settles down out of the thought storm we’re in and we can again see what’s at our core, Love.

What if Love is already within us? What if it’s what we really are, and is what connects us with everyone and everything?

In love there is no separation, and it’s in this love that there is a haven of complete and immense safety and comfort. 

When we argue with someone, what is it really that we’re looking for? Is it that they see our point of view, that we win the argument? Or is it the desire to experience closeness, love and connection with them?

Although it is very counter-intuitive, Bill and I are finding that when we see ourselves defending our beliefs, the best thing to do is to take a time out. With that, our minds settle and come back to more of our true nature, the Love that we are. From there, solutions that move us forward without compromise become apparent.

Try it and let us know what you find.

The recipe is an amazing dairy free Mac n Cheese. It’s made from potato, carrots, cashews and spices. Truly delicious. We don’t encourage pasta often because it’s a processed food. And occasionally it’s great fun to have.

To Your Amazing Health,
Connie and Bill

Mac n Cheese (Serves 3 to 4)

Dairy Free Mac n Cheese

1/4 cup raw cashews
1 1/4 cups peeled and diced yellow or red potatoes
1/2 cup peeled and diced carrots
4 tablespoons nutritional yeast
2 tablespoons avocado oil
5 tablespoons water
Juice of 1/2 lemon
3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 medium garlic clove, peeled
3/4 teaspoon apple cider or brown rice vinegar
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
12 oz. package of brown rice elbow macaroni

Bring 1 cup of water to a boil in a small pan and turn off the heat. Add the cashews to the water and soak for 30 minutes. Drain

Add potatoes and carrots to a small pot with 1 cup water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until fork tender. Drain.

Add all ingredients above to a high-speed blender and blend until smooth, the texture of a melted cheese. If the mixture is too thick, add a tablespoon of water at a time to bring it to the consistency you like.

Sample the sauce and adjust seasonings as desired.

Prepare the macaroni as per package instructions. Drain macaroni and pour cheese sauce over it, stirring well to coat all the pasta.

Add cooked kale or sliced Brussels sprouts to dish to balance it with health giving greens.

The sauce keeps for up to a week refrigerated in an airtight container.